Announcing Our First Short Story Contest (With Prizes!)

A laptop and notepad waiting for a writer.

(© MohdHafiez/Fotolia)


Leapsmag is all about high-quality journalism and expert commentary. So you may be wondering, why are we hosting a fiction contest?

The answer is that some of the most visionary ideas for the future of humanity and technology first emerged in fiction, from Jules Verne's prescient novels about space, air, and underwater travels in the 19th century, to Arthur C. Clarke's prediction of satellite communications in 1945, to Isaac Asimov's exploration of robot ethics in the 1950s, to William Gibson's depiction of "cyberspace" in 1982.

But speculative fiction writers don't only anticipate big breakthroughs; they also care about probing the societal, personal, and moral impacts of new technology.

Will the next astute observation come in the form of a short story for leapsmag? Let's find out!

ABOUT THE CONTEST:

The Prompt:

Explore a big moral question or a new opportunity raised by an emerging technology today, in the form of an original, previously unpublished piece of fiction of up to 3000 words.

The Rules:

Submissions must be received by midnight EST on September 15th, 2018. Send your story as a double-spaced attachment in size 12 Times New Roman font to kira@leapsmag.com. Include your name and a short bio. It is free to enter, and authors retain all ownership of their work. Upon submitting an entry, the author agrees to grant leapsmag one-time nonexclusive publication rights.

All submissions will be judged by the Editor-in-Chief on the basis of insightfulness, originality, quality of storytelling, and relevance to the prompt. The Contest is open to anyone around the world of any age, except for the friends and family of leapsmag staff and associates.

The winners will be announced by October 15th, 2018.

The Prizes:

Grand Prize: $500, publication of your story on leapsmag, and promotion on our social media channels.

First Runner-Up: $100 and a shout-out on our social media channels.

Good luck!

Kira Peikoff
Kira Peikoff is a journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, Nautilus, Popular Mechanics, The New York Academy of Sciences, and other outlets. She is also the author of four suspense novels that explore controversial issues arising from scientific innovation: Living Proof, No Time to Die, Die Again Tomorrow, and Mother Knows Best. Peikoff holds a B.A. in Journalism from New York University and an M.S. in Bioethics from Columbia University. She lives in New Jersey with her husband and son.
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